Publications

There are many twists and turns that a career path takes. Each new responsibility, each new team, each new challenge leads to new skills, new relationships, and fresh opportunities. These experiences, successes, and failures shape who we become professionally and is based on our own unique experiences.

What if everyone had to spend a year in a particular job? And what if that job was the kind of job that didn’t pay a guaranteed salary, and compensation was based solely on your success? What would you learn? How would you survive? And more importantly, how would the skills you learned shape the future of your career?

It may seem radical, but there is value in learning to survive and thrive, early in a professional career. And as challenging as some of those skills may seem, we do not doubt that they pay dividends in the long run: time management, strategy development, problem-solving, and especially overcoming fears. We all have parts of our jobs that we are “afraid” of; these are the things we don’t like to do or don’t feel confident doing. One of the most difficult things to do, for many people, is to pick up the phone, call a stranger, and ask a question. Think of how easy it has become to find just about anything we need from a quick Google search. From there, we can start a live chat or send an email, get what we need and never have to deal with a human. On the flip side of that, when we receive an email from an unknown source it’s very easy to ignore it, hit the delete button, or unsubscribe from a mailing list; all without speaking to a human.

Continue reading…


Ready to learn how to start a business?

In A Million Dollar Idea for Success in Business Andrise Bass, Ph.D., lays out the blueprint you need to take your business startup from idea to incorporation. Each chapter is broken down into simple, actionable chunks, which serves as a guide for new business owners looking to learn the basics. Bass uses her business development and entrepreneurship background to help you cross your dot your I’s and cross your T’s for a better startup.

Download your copy.

Continue reading…


Even if they don’t come in the form of super strength, super speed, the ability to fly or scale walls, we all have super powers. The challenge though, can be not just discovering them but knowing where and how to use them in the work environment, and even more specifically in the leadership space. Continue reading…


Profit is important, but it’s not the only indicator of a company’s health and well-being. All too often, profit is used as the primary source indicating success. We’re not saying numbers are not important- without them you don’t have a company. But for executives at Wells Fargo, the consequences of focusing on just the numbers seems to be bubbling up in a less than stellar way. For anyone in sales, this story may sound familiar. You’re working hard to fill your pipeline, get meetings, close deals and finally collect the all-mighty, highly coveted commission check.

Continue reading…


In the history of the successes and failures of businesses, size does not matter. The behemoths have just as much risk of failure as any medium to smaller sized company and success is not measured just by profits, nor is it just by growth. Success is agility, retention, and sometimes the result of reinvention which is driven by either marketplace, technology, or competition. But what happens when companies try to reverse stagnant or negative growth, and fail? Did they miss the opportunity to reinvent themselves? Did they try to reinvent, but in the wrong marketplace? Was the leadership looking to make changes only through external sources and not through internal adjustments? Regardless of the why, when giants fall, everyone notices.  The most recent behemoth to fall, or in business-speak suffer acquisition, is Yahoo Inc. Once a part of the triad of internet giants, it’s now an acquisition for Verizon.

Continue reading…